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  • Removing paint from a brickwall

    <p>Any recommendations? I need to remove paint from the walls of my
    basement. In some spots the paint is peeling, other spots it&#39;s like the
    paint is watered damaged (like the water seeps through the brick when
    it rains).</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>How would I get removing the paint from the brick walls in my basement. Via a do-it-yourself way.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Thanks.&nbsp;</p>


  • #2
    Rent a power washer.

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    • #3
      <p>
      <font size="1">Rent a power washer. </font>
      </p><p>Buy a power washer.&nbsp; They&#39;re great for a million things.</p>

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      • #4
        <p>
        <font size="1">Rent a power washer. </font>
        </p><p>if he doesn&#39;t have a french drain or sump hole and pump then it may be too much water to deal with?</p><p>what do ya think?</p>

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        • #5
          <p>I used to be a painting contractor, and I agree with the power washer idea. Of course that assumes your basement is block wall and is&nbsp;not finished.</p><p>If your basement <strong><em>is</em></strong> finished, I&#39;m afraid your best bet is a paint scrapper or putty knife (I usually prefer the putty knife) and some elbow grease.&nbsp; Also, a sturdy wire brush is a really useful tool.&nbsp; Even with the power washer, you will probably need these tools for stubborn spots on your wall.</p><p>Good luck!</p>

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          • #6
            <font style="font-size: 9px" face="Verdana">quote: <blockquote dir="ltr" style="margin-right: 0px"><p><font style="font-size: 9px" face="Verdana">quote:</font></p><font size="1">Rent a power washer. </font><p>&nbsp;</p><p>if he doesn&#39;t have a french drain or sump hole and pump then it may be too much water to deal with?</p><p>what do ya think?</p>
            </font>[/quote]Oooohhh, really good point.&nbsp; If no drain/pump, I&#39;d go with the tools and elbow grease idea (above).<br />

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            • #7
              <p>I used to be a painting contractor, and I agree with the power washer idea. Of course that assumes your basement is block wall and is&nbsp;not finished.</p><p>If your basement <strong><em>is</em></strong> finished, I&#39;m afraid your best bet is a paint scrapper or putty knife (I usually prefer the putty knife) and some elbow grease.&nbsp; Also, a sturdy wire brush is a really useful tool.&nbsp; Even with the power washer, you will probably need these tools for stubborn spots on your wall.</p><p>Good luck!</p><p>
              </p><p>couldn&#39;t he just scrape the loose stuff and then seal in the rest with something like UGL Drylok. I put 2 coats of UGL Drylok on my basement walls yet there are certain areas where water must sit behind the wall and it creates moisture spots that turn yellow or black. It&#39;s just a few small areas so i scrape them go over&nbsp;them with the Zinnser Bullseye stain guard.</p><p>Then someone told me to put a coat of polyurethane over these spots and then used the stain guard after it dries and it&#39;s holding up pretty well</p>

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              • #8
                <br />just throw some acetone on it<br />

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                • #9
                  <p>MDR55,</p><p>What is your ultimate goal? Are you looking to repaint or put up studs and sheetrock or paneling, insulation, etc?</p>

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                  • #10
                    <p>So far I like Funks approach the best. &nbsp;</p><p>What are you going to do with the wall after the paints off? Like Funk said, you may not need to take it all off. <br /></p>



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                    • #11
                      whoops...<br />

                      <font color=black>This message was edited by SatCam on 1-30-06 @ 7:32 PM</font>

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                      • #12
                        <p>Repaint it I guess. The bricks have been around since 1945 (when the house was built--it&#39;s a 3 family house).</p>

                        <font color=black>This message was edited by mdr55 on 1-30-06 @ 7:44 PM</font>

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                        • #13
                          <p>
                          <font size="1">Repaint it I guess.</font>
                          </p><p>i&#39;d say scarpe all the loose stuff then run a fan to dry up the moist areas. then put at least one coat of UGL Drylok to help keep most of the moisture out. The UGL Drylok is not that easy to work with. It&#39;s as thick as wallpaper paste and i put it on with a wallpaper paste brush, my fucking arms were dead after a couple days of that . </p><p>The UGL Drylok comes in 5 gallon buckets and it actuall leaves a nice white flat coat on the wall, especially with two coats. Have a big stick handy to mix the Drylok, if the buckets been sitting a while all the thick gooey stuff lays on the bottom and you have alot of mixing to do before using.</p>

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